Meet The Gunnison’s

GuSg-pony-tail

A male Gunnison Sage-grouse displays on a lek in the Gunnison Basin, Colorado

April is mating season for Sage-grouse in the West. There are two species: Greater Sage-grouse, which are more widespread, larger grouse; and Gunnison Sage-grouse, which are primarily located (87% of the total population) in the Gunnison, Colorado Basin. Gunnison Sage-grouse also have smaller, satellite leks, or mating grounds in west and southwest, CO and eastern Utah. Both Sage-grouse species are candidates for listing as Endangered Species, and Gunnison Sage-grouse are America’s fourth most endangered bird behind the ivory-billed woodpecker, California condor, and the whooping crane; but they are not on the endangered species list. Already endangered when they were recognized as a separate species from Greater Sage-grouse (GS-g), Gunnison Sage-grouse (GuS-g) have been the focal point of a regional collaborative initiative to improve habitat and recover the species. GuS-g were scheduled for a new listing decision this month, but the listing has been delayed, again. Would GuS-g benefit from listing? I don’t know, it’s a complex issue, but I do know that the extended Gunnison community has collaborated in the spirit of saving their namesake species and set a great example in the rural West. There are roughly 4,500 GuS-g in existence, total. They have a different bubbles popping vocalization than GS-g, are about 2/3 the size of GS-g, have broad white bands on tail feathers, and thick filo plume “pony tails” that flip up when males display for females. They also lek differently (in my observation), frequently using very large areas and splintering into small groups, using sagebrush for cover; presumably from predators. Golden eagles are the top predator of both Sage-grouse species, an easy target when they’re on a lek, displaying out in the open. Both Sage-grouse species live their entire life in sagebrush, and considered sagebrush “umbrella species”, meaning that by conserving sagebrush habitat, we help out the other 350 or so species that rely upon healthy, contiguous sagebrush habitat. Those species are under the Sage-grouse “umbrella.” If you’ve followed this blog at all, you know that my work is heavily focused on the sagebrush ecosystem.

GuPD-crouch

A Gunnison prairie dog crouches on a dirt mound in Gunnison Basin, CO

Gunnison prairie dogs (GuPD) are one of five prairie dog species in North America, all are imperiled. Once a candidate species for Endangered Species listing, GuPD are the third most imperiled species behind black-tailed and white-tailed. These guys are a higher altitude species than their cousins. living in the sagebrush ecosystem and shortgrass prairie between 6,000 and 12,000 feet. GuPD have white in the center of their tail, dig shallower burrows than black-tailed, and their burrows contain a single nest. They don’t store food – they eat and deficate outside. GuPD hibernate, living on body fat through the cold winter months.

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