Sage-grouse Season

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Greater Sage-grouse Female and Displaying Males In Snow – April in the heart of Greater Sage-grouse habitat. Sublette County, Wyoming

As snowfall steadily increased under a pewter sky, male Greater Sage-grouse did their best to impress the few females on the mating ground, or lek in a remote sagebrush setting south of Pinedale. The chests puffed up-yellow air sacs full-tail fanned-filo plumes standing tall on top of their heads display of male Greater Sage-grouse is said to be one of the most impressive in the animal kingdom. They sure work hard at it – every morning from mid-March into May, they arrive in darkness to perform their ancient ritual. Females will choose who to mate with and one male on a lek will do 80% of the mating. Sage-grouse are particularly vulnerable on a lek, where golden eagles can spot them at long distances. I found this particular lek when I saw a pile of feathers nearby, a telltale sign that an eagle had made a kill for an easy meal. But eagles aren’t why Sage-grouse are an Endangered Species Act (ESA) candidate species. Humans have fragmented the sagebrush landscape with development, powerlines, roads, and mega energy development; resulting in a steady decline, a death by a thousand cuts. They are the ultimate indicator species, spending their entire life in sagebrush. Although the lead up to a September, 2015 ESA listing decision places Greater Sage-grouse in the spotlight, mule deer and sagebrush “obligate” songbird declines are tracking with grouse. It’s an alarming situation that may seem all about grouse, but conservationists understand the entire ecosystem is in collapse. Audubon Rockies has assumed a leadership role with a clear vision through their Sagebrush Ecosystem Initiative and Wyoming has adopted the core habitat strategy to protect and conserve critical Greater Sage-grouse habitat. There’s a head-spinning amount of activity surrounding the Sage-grouse recovery effort, which continues to ramp up. Things are often complicated in the West, particularly when grouse live on top of enormous oil and natural gas deposits. The solutions are simple – respect wildlife by giving them freedom to roam and muster the courage to leave their remaining habitat undeveloped. The female Greater Sage-grouse in this photograph will mate and retreat to a nest under a sagebrush where she’ll sit on 6-10 eggs. A few will probably reach maturity and return to this same lek as they have for thousands of years, vital to the survival of the species. What can you do? Contact the good folks at Audubon Rockies and let them know you’d like to help. And of course I’ll always be happy to talk to you about Sage-grouse anytime.

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