North Cascades – Turf and Surf

Sahale Arm, Sahale Glacier
Sahale Cloudscape : Prints Available

After a long night of heavy rain battering our Sahale Glacier camp, a brief sun break pierces layers of clouds and ridgelines from Sahale Arm. The tarn in the foreground is catching runoff from the glacier above. Our stormy experience was an anomoly this season, a parched summer of little rain and fire.

After a wonderful evening of presenting Sage Spirit to an enthusiastic Braided RiverMountaineers audience, we set out for the North Cascades, winding up our trip on Orcas Island, in the San Juan Islands off Washington’s northwest coast. More than half of the glaciers in the Lower 48 are in the North Cascades and North Cascades glaciers are retreating subjects of intense study. The Cascades aren’t as tall as the Rockies, but the vertical uplift from the Pacific Ocean is dizzying – Mount Baker rises over 10,000 feet and accumulates a deep snowpack from Pacific flows in winter (except last winter, when it barely snowed at all). And you feel all of that vertical in your legs. The trek to Sahale Glacier camp was a 4,000 foot ascent from deep Douglas fir/western cedar forest to the land of rock and ice. Unfortunately, we saw little of the Sahale area, as a pretty rough storm pinned us in our tent for 18 hours or so. Happy to see the earth quenched for the first time this parched summer, we descended and sought solitude in the Mount Baker Wilderness, then the San Juan Islands just off the coast. There’s so much here! Want to read a great book about the North Cascades? Check out The North Cascades – Finding Beauty and Renewal In The Wild Nearby by Braided River. The images that follow are but a quick glimpse, just enough to whet our appetite for a more in depth study. Continue reading “North Cascades – Turf and Surf”

Wildflower Walk

wildflowers, Capitol Peak
Wildflower Walk : Prints Available

Our path to Silver Creek Pass leads through a verdant green alpine meadow of blooming Indian paintbrush and cinquefoil wildflowers. The pass is the patch of snow in the low point between the mountains (a 1,500′ climb), where a staggering view of (14,130′) Capitol Peak awaits.

The pass ahead is a window to a new world, one of the great gifts of exploring on foot. We ascended 1,500′ to a low point on the flank of Meadow Mountain, where Capitol Peak shone in afternoon light while clouds swirled ominously around the basin. Runoff from both sides of the pass feed the Crystal River, a tributary of the mighty Colorado. Snowfall from the spring monsoon is finally melting off, opening the mountains for a few short months of exploration, before the cycle of seasons starts anew. The brilliant green tundra and blooming wildflowers are almost an illusion, a fleeting moment of alpine rhythm.

Capitol-storm-II

Spotlight on Capitol Peak (14,130′) as a storm builds in the Elk Mountains. Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness Area, Colorado